Sunday, 14 May 2017

Super Geek Heroes: Review & Giveaway

Jared-David could spend all day on his tablet if I let him. The videos he normally watches are not exactly educational and more silly and dare I say pointless! (apologies to all you kinder and toy video makers). We recently were sent an email about a new video playlist which is educational and includes super heroes.

These super geek heroes are on a mission to learn! Children in foundation stage will benefit from watching these videos as the super heroes super powers come from three prime and four specific development areas which are, personal, social and emotional development, understanding the world, communication and language, literacy, numeracy, physical development and creative arts and design. So now you know a little bit about what they are let me introduce them to you.


Jake Jotter
He is the cheeky chap of the bunch. Jake's super powers help children with improving their reading and writing. Jake get's around by flying on his magic jet powered pencil.





Suzy Smiles
Suzy is considerate, loving, upbeat and very helpful. Suzy is always kind to others and really values friendships. It's no surprise that Suzy uses her powers to support and help strengthen their emotional health and intelligence.


Vicky Voice
Vicky is a very bright girl, she can speak every language in the world! Vicky uses her powers to help children with communication. Vicky uses phonic sounds to help children with speaking clearly and the alphabet.


Ronnie Rock
Ronnie loves nothing more than being creative, he is apparently a good singer! Ronnie zooms around his musical scooter helping children to become more creative by singing, dancing and painting.







Peter Planet
Peter has a solar powered hover board which takes him from mission to mission. He is a very smart boy, an expert in the weather and the seasons. He knows about what grows and lives on our planet.


Ant Active
Ant loves all sports and knows so much about loads of them, football, golf, tennis etc. He is always full of energy. Ant uses his powers to help show children how they can be healthy through eating and playing.










Millie Maths
Millie is super smart and as her name suggests very very good at maths. Millie likes to help children learn to love mathematics all the while bouncing around on her space hopper in the shape of the number five.









The videos are really nice to watch and each one varies on topic depending which super geek is on the episode. I really love that they are short, sweet and educational. I watched all the episodes and think they are perfect and a great alternative to the usual nonsense that my son watches. Jared-David is in foundation stage at school and everything is spoken and spelt out in phonics, this is something I really like about the videos. A lot of educational programmes on TV don't use phonics when spelling out and pronouncing words but these do which helps with keeping in line with his current learning style.

I set the playlist up for Jared-David, he wasn't very happy at first as he wanted to watch some toys being thrown into a paddling pool (really is that the entertainment for 5year olds?). I told Jared-David it was a super hero show and that he should just try and watch it see if he liked it. Well he must of liked it as he watched them all. Peter is his favourite and I have been told I need to buy a hoover board (hover board) for him for Christmas. Peter was also his favourite because he was teaching him all about what he is learning in school about seasons. Jared-David has already shown two of his friends super geek heroes and also his teacher who seemed very impressed. I gave the teacher the details of the videos and told her how to find them and she was going to watch them to see if it is something she could maybe use in the classroom.


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Monday, 8 May 2017

Tips On How To Deal With Bad Behaviour

How many time's do I need to tell you!! This is something I'm having to say more and more now a days and it's really grating on me. My son has lately started speaking and treating me differently I'm getting the 'I hate you' on a daily basis, I've no idea what I have done wrong some days. I have been trying to find different ways to discipline this new behaviour but it is so hard to find the right balance and what is appropriate for his age. Obviously I can't just leave it as I don't want him to think that it's acceptable to treat people this way. I have spoken to teachers at his school who say that he is as good as gold at school, great but not so great when it makes me feel like I'm doing something is wrong at home.

Below is a few things we have tried, some have worked better than others.

Talking
Shouting doesn't work. When does shouting ever work? We have now started to talk with Jared-David, asking him why he has done what ever it is he has done. This works to an extent for example when he is throwing the odd coco pop onto the floor I ask him why is he doing that? he will then say he doesn't no why or because he is bored. I then explain that it's nice to do that and it causes a mess that he will have to pick up. This usually works fine and doesn't result in any sort of an argument which is great. I've found that if Jared-David is in a bad mood and feeling grumpy, talking doesn't work so well as he will just shout and scream and it gets us nowhere which brings me onto the next one.

Time Out
When he was younger this never worked and time out would drag out for hours and hours. I think now that he is a bit older and has the capacity to reflect a little about his behaviour time out is working. When the shouting, screaming and tantrum starts then he is sent to time out to calm down and to have a think. The time he spends in time out is up to him and he knows that, I will not set a time as I don't know how long it will take him to calm and feel ready to come and have a chat with me about his actions that got him sent there.

Behaviour Chart
We have recently stopped using the chart but there were big benefits from it and also some negatives. On our chart we tackled certain areas which needed to improve, bed time and tea time mainly. We agreed that if there was a 12 or more stars in one week then he would get a reward just something small like a magazine. This worked for a while but then it got to a point where when we were shopping or went somewhere he would ask for something because he had been good that day I would then explain about the chart and that we don't get rewards everyday, this then caused tantrums. As the chart had served it's purpose for improving his behaviour in certain areas we decided to stop using it.

Speak To Others
My son is no angel that I know. However I also knew that some of his new behaviours had been seen and picked up from other children, it's just a part of life I guess. Jared-David had started saying swear words that neither Liam or myself use so I knew it was time to talk to his teachers. When I spoke to his teacher I also explained about other things he had started doing at home an the manner in which he had started speaking to me. His teacher has been great and dealt with the swearing issue and has also been teaching all children not just mine about how to speak with people. I think as parents we often try and deal with it all ourselves which is fine but sometimes speaking with a teacher, childminder or even health visitor can work wonders.

Children are such hard work and often test us but sometimes it can be due to us not understanding. We often forget that they don't know how to act in certain situations and don't know how to appropriately react to their emotions. They are still learning and although they we might sometimes struggle and feel like there is nothing we can do, just remember you are not the only parent going through this and there is help available if you need it. Asking for help isn't a way of saying you are rubbish it shows that you care and want to find the best way possible. 

Sunday, 30 April 2017

Little Mouse Helps Out: Book Review

Children in England have a less than positive attitude towards reading than in other countries, only 26% of 10 year-olds 'like reading' compared to 46% in Portugal, 42% in Georgia, 35% in Romania and 33% in Azerbaijan. My son currently loves reading and I hope this is something that will continue, we read with him at least once a day and I know that he reads at schools. It is upsetting to know that most children do not read or enjoy reading on a daily basis. For me tucking your child into bed a grabbing a book to read is second nature, it's part of that 'perfect' mother image. You see it in all the films too. 

We have a few book shelves in our house, one for Jared-David, one for me and soon one for Eryn-Rose. The newest addition to Jared-David's book shelf is a book called 'Little Mouse Helps Out' by Riikka Jantti. On first glance of the book the illustration caught my eye and reminded me of books from when I was a child. Riikka Jantti is also the illustrator which I think is great as it captures the look of what the author wanted the character's to look like. I also like that the pictures aren't really modern to the point you know everything was digitally created. 


When it came to reading the book I snuggled up with the kids on the sofa. After reading the first few pages Jared-David said 'mummy did you write this book?' I explained to him that I didn't and asked him why he thought that. Jared-David then explained that what was happening in the book is like what happens at home with us. For example there is a part in the story where the mouse is trying to get his own drink and it spills everywhere and although the mouse looks a bit upset mummy mouse says 'That's all right' and cleans it up. The more we read the more we could relate which is why this is now a firm favourite in our house. 

I think the story is one that many families can relate to and I find when reading to Jared-David if a book is relate able or just really 'awesome' then it keeps them interested. If a child is interested then they are more likely to learn to love to read. We truly loved this story and will be getting more stories from Riikka Jantti,